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Posted on 08/01/2014 in by
Sara Hopps
,
Student

My name is Sara Hopps, a recent graduate from UMass Amherst from the BDIC program, with a degree in Regenerative Community Engagement and a certificate in Sustainable Food and Farming. Creating my own major enabled me to fully engage and challenge myself in the university as well as the larger community, setting me on a path towards community engagement.

Posted on 07/01/2014 in by
Matt Lee
,
Student

My name is Matt. This past year I was on the Permaculture committee and now I'm a part of the UMassPermaculture Summer Garden Crew! This upcoming semester will be the start of my fifth year at UMass (my last semester!).  I'm really happy and excited to have the opportunity to work in the gardens this summer.  It's funny because one of the main reasons my interest in sustainability and food even began was from reading Michael Pollan's book, "The Omnivore’s Dilemma," and he just came to speak at UMass last week!

Posted on 06/06/2014 in by
Sammi Gay
,
Student Garden Manager

Heya! My name is Sammi Gay and I’m the new Student Garden Manager here with UMass Permaculture. A few things about me: I’m a NYC native and a rising junior at UMass.

Posted on 04/04/2014 in by
Gifford Delle
,
Student

The 2014 Revisioning Sustainability Conference, (or RS2014) is a 4-day immersive educational experience at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. The focus of RS2014 is going “beyond sustainability” discuss the benefits of incorporating “regenerative” practices into food systems at campuses across the nation.

Posted on 03/11/2014 in by
Molly Bajgot
,
Student Auxiliary Sustainability Coordinator

Trash Fish. They’re the fish you don’t usually meet: the Dog Fish, the Yellowtail Rockfish, the Sand Dab…Also known as Rough Fish, these fish species are more populated (sometimes invasive!) but just as delicious as better-known species.

Posted on 02/12/2014 in by
Brooke Lavallee
,
UMass Dining Intern

Wondering what all this talk about the Real Food Challenge is?

The UMass Real Food Challenge (RFC) is a student led initiative, in partnership with UMass Dining, that aims to bring 20% Real Food to our campus by the year 2020.

It’s our time to make a change, and we want Real Food!

As students of UMass, we have shown that we have the passion and drive to make a difference. Thousands of students around the country are already working to create a better sustainable and just food system, and by signing the Real Food Challenge, we are pledging to do the same.

Posted on 01/26/2014 in by
Gifford Delle
,
Student

Agroforestry is an ecological approach to farming that incorporates trees as a central element of an agricultural system. Agroforestry pays close attention to the ecology of a landscape, or the relationship between different species. The idea is that by adding trees to an ecosystem the environmental, social, and economic value of that ecosystem will be improved.

Posted on 01/13/2014 in by
Gifford Delle
,
Student

Weeds get a lot of negative press, but once you’ve heard about dynamic accumulators you’ll be open to using weeds as an active and functional part of your garden. There are hundreds of weeds out there that don’t deserve the harsh treatment we’ve so commonly given them. In fact an area of land with a lot of weeds usually is an indicator of soil health, and nitrogen richness which many of the fruits and veggies we eat need to thrive.

Posted on 12/20/2013 in by
Gifford Delle
,
Student

With the arrival of a cold, white, snowy winter, we at UMass Permaculture can’t help but think about the prospects of a green spring thaw! We’re brimming with anticipation for our most exciting event of the spring, the 2014 Revisioning Sustainability Conference.

Posted on 11/28/2013 in by
Gifford Delle
,
Student

Vertical gardening has picked up a lot of speed in urban agricultural movements in recent years, and people are beginning to develop these structures more readily. The reason for this could be because of the obvious benefits that a green wall, or vertical garden brings to an urban area. The title Green Wall does an apt job of describing what a green wall actually is: a vertical surface (aka a wall) with vegetation growing up it.

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